Igles Corelli

Atman

via Roma, 4
Pescia (Pistoia)
T. +39.0572.1903678
info@ristoranteatman.it

Before Ferran Adrià had used the first syphon, before the name Hervè This sounded familiar to the gourmets of the Eighties, Igles Corelli was the world's most creative chef. He was more than that. He plated up innovative masterpieces at the Trigabolo, in the countryside of Argenta, near Ferrara. Marchesi and Girardet were his competitors. Perhaps without having his talent. Corelli was the leader of a kitchen brigade that was like the Monty Python in movie theatres. Pure genius.

The adventure at the Trigabolo then came to an end but the chef went on his road and continues, daily, to innovate in the kitchen. Not his own, but that of all the chefs who have learnt from him the artistic and cultural value of an art that, at the time, was not yet considered an art. At least not in Italy. Corelli's merits go beyond his personal skills. Because he was one of the first to use raw materials that weren't part of cliché high cuisine. French school, that is. Corelli has always loved the ingredients from his own territory, made of lagoon, rain, brackish waters. From bald-coot to eel, from wild herbs to blue fish. And most of all, game. Corelli has always been one of the most extraordinary game chefs, his dishes are exemplary.

But during his career he has also learnt to select great products coming from afar. Fish comes from blue waters: in general, no ichthyic product comes from farms. The meat of domestic animals comes from organic or biodynamic farms. Same for flours. After a long experience at the Locanda delle Tamerici in Ostellato, today Igles Corelli cooks in another region, Tuscany, in Pescia, where he continues to teach to the younger generations the foundations of cooking while he keeps on collecting acknowledgements, such as the Michelin star shining in the 2012 edition. He also appears on TV, though he's less exposed than others, and offers his consultancy to various restaurants in the world. Listening to him at a cuisine congress is a great opportunity to look back over the history of creative cuisine.
 

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Identità Milano


by

Samuele Amadori

Samuele Amadori è un giornalista romagnolo. 31 anni, vive a Bologna e lavora per la Rai. Per anni l’enogastronomia è stata il suo mestiere, ora è tornato al primo amore della cronaca. Ma la passione per il buon cibo non è evaporata, e continua a esplorare il territorio alla ricerca di grandi tavole. Emilia Romagna, Umbria e Inghilterra le sue zone di caccia preferite


Fried spinosini with wild Murge king trumpet mushrooms
Crispy Marans egg on a bed of wild Murge kind trumpet mushrooms and Occelli Testun sauce
Minced Mora Romagnola beef with crunchy Altamura bread, spicy Piennolo tomato sauce and cabbage chutney
Cinta Senese pork cheek cooked at a low temperature with soft Avezzano potatoes in a crispy Formenton otto file della Garfagnana polenta wafer